What Is Campus Climate

The University of Minnesota supports a welcoming campus climate in which all persons are treated with respect. Toward that end, the University facilitates, sustains, and advances a culture that supports equity, inclusion, and community by fostering dialogue, respect, and personal growth. These purposeful activities and shared responsibility provide an environment that allows everyone the opportunity to succeed.

Campus Climate Background

Campus climate emerged over the last three years as a pressing issue through the Twin Cities campus strategic planning process, as well as past and current grassroots efforts led by campus groups concerned about the experiences of marginalized groups at the University of Minnesota.

To address campus climate issues, in early 2014 President Kaler charged senior leaders with forming the Campus Climate Workgroup (CCWG) to study climate on the Twin Cities campus–what’s working, what resources are in place, and what needs to change. A report detailing their efforts and short- and long-term recommendations was released on Jan. 15, 2015.

Because the University needed broad input from students, staff, and faculty about campus climate concerns, the CCWG endorsed using methods from the Art of Participatory Leadership, also known as the Art of Hosting.

The University began by holding four World Cafés in the fall of 2014. Two in October for students, and one each in November for faculty and staff. Those conversations provided space for people to share their stories and ideas and to inform the recommendations found in the CCWG report.

On Feb. 5, 2015, over 425 students, staff, and faculty came together in an Open Space event called “Campus Climate: From Conversation to Action.” Throughout the day the group discussed more than 50 topics, and scores of recommendations emerged.

During the 2015-2016 academic year, the Campus Climate Workgroup focused on continued implementation of recommendations from the 2014 report, improving the climate for faculty and staff, continued campus community engagement, and proactive communications. The Campus Climate Core Planning Team led several engagement activities, launched a pilot micro-grant project and in collaboration with the Coalition for a Respectful U, created a successful proposal to establish a Bias Response Team on the Twin Cities campus.

Priorities in the 2016-2017 academic year will include a continued push to hire more diverse faculty and staff, collecting data about progress in campus climate efforts and current issues, fully implementing the Bias Response Team and ongoing engagement with the campus community.